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Charmaine
11 years ago

I beautiful woman I met many years ago in Canberra with her sister Coral (Oomera) . My thoughts to all her family and especially Coral on the passing of a strong beautiful sister. With Respect Charmaine Geraldton, Western Australia

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Joyce Earnshaw
11 years ago

When Lola joined the Pritchard family, she was welcomed with open arms. .Everyone loved her calm and peaceful manner. I myself always seemed to feel calm when in her immediate presence. Over the years, though we mainly met at family gatherings, some very happy ones and some very sad.es, she would always manage to bring a smile to our faces but I alsolearnt that she was a firm adversary to the wrongs of the world, and not just for Indigenous People. She would steadfastly defend the rights of her new Family on the Blue Mountains "The Pritchard’s". I have learnt from Oral history that My Mother Florence Hanna Henshaw, was of Aboriginal descent.. I have never been able to find a record of my Mother’s birth. Unfortunately, I was not that interested when a child and my Parents didn’t talk of their childhood much and they were both deceased when became interested. I joined the local Family History group when I retired and one of the first things they taught us was, not to believe "Oral History" After my Brother Fred's funeral, while refreshments were being served, Lola and I found each other sitting chatting, when she suddenly said to me. "Why don't you accept your Aboriginal Ancestry?" I was a bit surprised, as I had not really thought about it a lot, one way or the other. It was not that I was ashamed to be Aboriginal, it was more that I thought, I suppose, that it was time for us to all just be Australian but as I said to her. "Mainly it was because I had no proof", no piece of paper to confirm my Mother’s Birth. Lola thought for a moment; She said. "Aboriginals, especially those born around about the time your Mother was born, do not need a piece of paper. 'We accept you'. Your Brother and his family have allowed us to accept them and have acknowledged their birth right. You are one of us and we need to help each other to find our ancestors and keep the dreaming alive" or something like that. Not quite sure of her exact words. I thought about it briefly but tucked it away in the too hard part of my brain. I have been tracing Family History for many years and gaining "Pieces of Paper" to confirm my English Fathers Birth right. The one hour Graveside and 2 hour memorial service for Lola, on Friday 5th August, opened my eyes and mind to why I now want to really accept my heritage. The Graveside Service was a Family only Service but to my amazement there must have been about 100 people there. The majority were Indigenous. A large coach had brought around 50 of Lola's Sisters, who were also part of the Stolen Generation. These women were mostly ex Cootamundra Girls Home for aboriginal children, which were also stolen from their families, to make them fit into "White person's ways". These were "The Coota Girls" who Lola constantly talked about and was always willing to help. There was also a mini bus with more Sisters and brothers from Redfern, where Lola had worked and still visited in her retirement. Also lots of Brothers and Sisters she had helped to find their families, through "Link Up". She was a founding member and recently a Director. There were also many members of the Indigenous family she had become friends with on The Blue Mountains. Also attending were her own immediate family; Sister, nephew and Uncle. And many of Bill (Terry's) family and friends, all weeping for the sudden sad parting of Lola and joined together to remember her remarkable life. This was the first time in my life that I had ever been in an assembly that was mainly "Black" and I was moved to tears by the wonderful Eulogies that I heard and I realised how humble Lola was, as I myself had no idea of the extent of the work she had done for her people and the numbers she had helped and touched. I feel so Proud that I knew her. My Nephew Terry and Lola were devoted to each other they just seemed to be as one, in whatever company they were with and Terry, as I know him orBill if you like, will need lots of support from Family and friends to help him through this sad time. They say time does heal the grieving, but it can be a very long time and only the wonderful, happy memories and the support of family and friends can get one through it. Fondest wishes to All, especially Terry and Alma Love from Aunty Joycie, I will never forget you Lola.

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Joyce Earnshaw
11 years ago

When Lola joined the Pritchard family, she was welcomed with open arms. .Everyone loved her calm and peaceful manner. I myself always seemed to feel calm when in her immediate presence. Over the years, though we mainly met at family gatherings, some very happy ones and some very sad.es, she would always manage to bring a smile to our faces but I alsolearnt that she was a firm adversary to the wrongs of the world, and not just for Indigenous People. She would steadfastly defend the rights of her new Family on the Blue Mountains "The Pritchard’s". I have learnt from Oral history that My Mother Florence Hanna Henshaw, was of Aboriginal descent.. I have never been able to find a record of my Mother’s birth. Unfortunately, I was not that interested when a child and my Parents didn’t talk of their childhood much and they were both deceased when became interested. I joined the local Family History group when I retired and one of the first things they taught us was, not to believe "Oral History" After my Brother Fred's funeral, while refreshments were being served, Lola and I found each other sitting chatting, when she suddenly said to me. "Why don't you accept your Aboriginal Ancestry?" I was a bit surprised, as I had not really thought about it a lot, one way or the other. It was not that I was ashamed to be Aboriginal, it was more that I thought, I suppose, that it was time for us to all just be Australian but as I said to her. "Mainly it was because I had no proof", no piece of paper to confirm my Mother’s Birth. Lola thought for a moment; She said. "Aboriginals, especially those born around about the time your Mother was born, do not need a piece of paper. 'We accept you'. Your Brother and his family have allowed us to accept them and have acknowledged their birth right. You are one of us and we need to help each other to find our ancestors and keep the dreaming alive" or something like that. Not quite sure of her exact words. I thought about it briefly but tucked it away in the too hard part of my brain. I have been tracing Family History for many years and gaining "Pieces of Paper" to confirm my English Fathers Birth right. The one hour Graveside and 2 hour memorial service for Lola, on Friday 5th August, opened my eyes and mind to why I now want to really accept my heritage. The Graveside Service was a Family only Service but to my amazement there must have been about 100 people there. The majority were Indigenous. A large coach had brought around 50 of Lola's Sisters, who were also part of the Stolen Generation. These women were mostly ex Cootamundra Girls Home for aboriginal children, which were also stolen from their families, to make them fit into "White person's ways". These were "The Coota Girls" who Lola constantly talked about and was always willing to help. There was also a mini bus with more Sisters and brothers from Redfern, where Lola had worked and still visited in her retirement. Also lots of Brothers and Sisters she had helped to find their families, through "Link Up". She was a founding member and recently a Director. There were also many members of the Indigenous family she had become friends with on The Blue Mountains. Also attending were her own immediate family; Sister, nephew and Uncle. And many of Bill (Terry's) family and friends, all weeping for the sudden sad parting of Lola and joined together to remember her remarkable life. This was the first time in my life that I had ever been in an assembly that was mainly "Black" and I was moved to tears by the wonderful Eulogies that I heard and I realised how humble Lola was, as I myself had no idea of the extent of the work she had done for her people and the numbers she had helped and touched. I feel so Proud that I knew her. My Nephew Terry and Lola were devoted to each other they just seemed to be as one, in whatever company they were with and Terry, as I know him orBill if you like, will need lots of support from Family and friends to help him through this sad time. They say time does heal the grieving, but it can be a very long time and only the wonderful, happy memories and the support of family and friends can get one through it. Fondest wishes to All, especially Terry and Alma Love from Aunty Joycie, I will never forget you Lola.

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Joyce Earnshaw
11 years ago

When Lola joined the Pritchard family, she was welcomed with open arms. Everyone loved her calm and peaceful manner. I myself always seemed to feel calm when in her immediate presence. Over the years, though we mainly met at family gatherings, some very happy ones and some very sad. Lola would always manage to bring a smile to our faces but I also learnt that she was a firm adversary to the wrongs of the world, and not just for Indigenous People. She would als steadfastly defend the rights of her new Family on the Blue Mountains "The Pritchard’s". I have learnt from Oral history that My Mother Florence Hanna Henshaw, was of Aboriginal descent.. I have never been able to find a record of my Mother’s birth. Unfortunately, I was not that interested when a child and my Parents didn’t talk of their childhood and they were both deceased when I became interested. I joined the local Family History group when I retired and one of the first things they taught us was, not to believe "Oral History" After my Brother Fred's funeral, while refreshments were being served, Lola and I found each other sitting chatting, when she suddenly said to me. "Why don't you accept your Aboriginal Ancestry?" I was a bit surprised, as I had not really thought about it a lot, one way or the other. It was not that I was ashamed to be Aboriginal, it was more that I thought, I suppose, that it was time for us all to just be Australian but as I said to her. "Mainly it was because I had no proof", no piece of paper to confirm my Mother’s Birth. Lola thought for a moment; She said. "Aboriginals, especially those born around about the time your Mother was born, do not need a piece of paper. 'We accept you'. Your Brother and his family have allowed us to accept them and have acknowledged their birth right. You are one of us and we need to help each other to find our ancestors and keep the dreaming alive" or something like that. Not quite sure of her exact words. I thought about it briefly at the time but tucked it away in the too hard part of my brain. I have been tracing Family History for many years and gaining "Pieces of Paper" to confirm my English Fathers Birth right. The one hour Graveside and 2 hour memorial service for Lola, on Friday 5th August, opened my eyes and mind to why I now want to really accept my heritage. The Graveside Service was a Family only Service but to my amazement there must have been about 100 people there. The majority were Indigenous. A large coach had brought around 50 of Lola's Sisters, who were also part of the Stolen Generation. These women were mostly ex Cootamundra Girls Home children, who, like Lola, were also stolen from their families. These were "The Coota Girls" who Lola constantly talked about and was always willing to help. There was also a mini bus with more Sisters and brothers from Redfern, where Lola had worked and still visited in her retirement. Also lots of Brothers and Sisters she had helped to find their families, through "Link Up". Lola I was told was a founding member and recently a Director of Link Up. There were also many members of the Indigenous family she had become friends with on The Blue Mountains. Also attending were her own immediate family; Sister, nephew and Uncle. And many of Bill (Terry's) family and friends, all weeping for the sudden sad parting of Lola, all joined together to remember her remarkable life. This was the first time in my life that I had ever been in an assembly that was mainly "Black" and I was moved to tears by the wonderful Eulogies that I heard and I realised how humble Lola was, as I myself had no idea of the extent of the work she had done for her people and the numbers she had helped and touched. I feel so Proud that I knew her and that she became part of our family. My Nephew Terry and Lola were devoted to each other, they just seemed to be as one, in whatever company they were with and Terry, as I know him or Bill if you like, will need lots of support from Family and friends to give him the strength to cope with the terrible grief. They say time does heal the grieving, but it can be a very long time and only the wonderful, happy memories and the support of family and friends can get one through it. Fondest wishes to All, especially Terry and Alma Love from Aunty Joycie, I will never forget you Lola.

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Tarina Fanning
11 years ago

Aunty Lola, I only met you in 2008, but have always remembered your strength, wisdom and courage. You sat beside me with Uncle Bill in Canberra when the Apology was given you held my hand and gave me strength. You offered comfort through your own tears and for that I will always be grateful. A wonderful strong Aboriginal woman who will be sadly missed, Tarina Fanning (Larrakia - Saltwater People)

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Shaan Hamann
11 years ago

Aunty Lola you were part of our family For as long as we can recall You touched our lives in many ways Time shared on holidays Or a quick chat or visit just to catch up The significant events you were there To provide support, insight and strength With your presence, your vision, your wealth of experience Inspired us to work harder in the struggle Our observation is that you paved the way for the younger generations Your guidance appreciated Your love and commitment to our mob We relied on you to filter out the latest news You were an advocate and well respected leader We recognise and honour your place you now hold We admired your courage, enduring energy, persistent battles, and heartfelt adour A natural story teller you were Stories shared that burn in our heart and memory And always a laugh to go along side This we will miss We will never forget You will remain in hearts and memories forever more Aunty Lola you were part of our family For as long as we can recall You touched our lives in many ways Time shared on holidays Or a quick chat or visit just to catch up The significant events you were there To provide support, insight and strength With your presence, your vision, your wealth of experience Inspired us to work harder in the struggle Our observation is that you paved the way for the younger generations Your guidance appreciated Your love and commitment to our mob We relied on you to filter out the latest news You were an advocate and well respected leader We recognise and honour your place you now hold We admired your courage, enduring energy, persistent battles, and heartfelt adour A natural story teller you were Stories shared that burn in our heart and memory And always a laugh to go along side This we will miss We will never forget You will remain in hearts and memories forever more Shaan, Peter,Adam and Meagan

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