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Clergy News Friday 27 May 2011 - Mrs Greta Lo Mrs Greta Lo has died in Sydney, on Friday 13 May, at the age of 88. Her late husband was the Reverend Luther Lo, Vicar of the Chinese Mission of the Epiphany in Little Bourke Street. He died in office in 1972. Amongst other activities, Greta Lo had a ministry with the Friendship Group, which was instrumental in laying the foundation for the Asian ministry now at St. Matthias’ Church in North Richmond. She worked with the Revd Ray Wilson and with the Revd Dr Victor and Winnie Yu in cultivating that parish’s development. Greta Lo was active in her home parish of Holy Trinity Church, Kew, as well as being a member of the Women’s Missionary Council of CMS. There is to be a Memorial Service next week at All Saints’ Woollahra in Sydney. We pay tribute to her faithful service and give thanks to God for her life. Mrs Greta Lo is survived by her only child, Christopher, who lives in the USA. Please pray for Christopher and the family.

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We will be remembering you on Ascension Day as you hold the thanksgiving service for your mother. On the same day in Melbourne we are having a special thanksgiving for the men and women ordained as deacons 25 years ago in 1986 - so we will remember Greta and give thanks for her life and ministry at that time. May God continue to encourage you at this time. I read with interest how Greta helped John and Gaylene Harrower as they set out to South America - thanks be to God. yours in Christ + Barbara The Rt Revd Barbara Darling Bishop of the Eastern Region Diocese of Melbourne The Anglican Centre 209 Flinders Lane MELBOURNE 3000

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Anonymous
10 years ago

Chris, By reading all of the tributes to your Mother, I can tell how very much she was loved by both friends, and family. She sounds like a person that would be an asset to any who know her. I wish very much I could have been counted as one of those. Chris, I am so very sorry you couldn't go to Australia for her. Be sure that in spirit you were there for your Mother - and she knew it. One day you will be re-united with her and your Father. We wish you Peace. Thomas and Priscilla

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Priscilla Clark
10 years ago

Chris, reading all of the tributes to your Mother show how very much she was loved and admired by all who knew her. I wish i could be counted as one of those who knew her. She must have been a wonderful mother to you, and an awesome sibling, and friend. I am so very sorry you were unable to go to Australia, but you were there in spirit and your mom knows that. You will be together again, along with your Father. This has been such a trying time in your life, but this too, shall pass. Peace from both me and Thomas.

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Anonymous
10 years ago

I have known the Los from the first time they came to Australia, when Rev Luther Lo was ministering at the then Missions to Seamen when they were located at the Rocks. I do remember their hospitality in the apartment above the mission, and growing up with their son Christopher, who is roughly the same age. My parents and I maintained contact through the Chinese churches, and also after the family's move to Melbourne. Chris and I maintained contact, although living in different states, and now different countries. As both of us were only children, and he was out of the country, I would make it a point to visit Greta in the Goodwin Village, where she would show me the love and encouragement which she has shown me for decades. Enjoy your eternal rest.

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Christopher Lo
10 years ago

The Collect for this Ascension Day, asks God to “clothe us with the power promised from on high, and send us forth to the ends of the earth as heralds of repentance and witness of Jesus Christ.” I could not have imagined a more appropriate prayer to sum up my mother’s life work and ministry on this earth. May we boldly proclaim at this service that we can celebrate our Lord’s reign in glory and triumph. Loudly may we say, “O death, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting?” (1 Corinthians 15:55) I wish I could be with you in person. To me, my absence is both shameful and painful. The failure to fulfill my filial duties and responsibilities will always torture my conscience. Today, however, is not about me and my failings. We are here to offer praise to God, and to honor my mother’s life and work. Alas, I can not leave the United States at the present time. I realize that my absence has caused much displeasure and even anger among family and friends. For that I apologize, beg for your indulgence and ask that you please keep me in your prayers. In Romans 12:2, St. Paul taught us “Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.” I have long suspected that in my mother’s youth, she may have embraced the Christian faith to legitimize some moralistic views which she held dear. These “views” would certainly include: One shouldn’t smoke, or drink or play cards. If one was really spiritual, one should sell one’s television set (that may account for the fact that I was fifteen before my mother allowed a television set and a black and white one at that, in our home). Never drink coffee or tea, or alcohol ever again. Do not go to the cinema or theater. There should be a three feet rule guarding the co-mingling of men and women.. An American, Stephen Howard, is the Chief Executive of “Business in the Community,” an organization based in London, U. K. He recently told an audience at Windsor Castle about an encounter in his young adulthood with Mother Teresa. She happened to be assigned to a seat next to his on a flight departing New Delhi. Mother Teresa smiled at Stephen Howard and asked “What do you do?” He began to reply when Mother Teresa stopped him and remarked “I meant, what do you do that matters?” Through my mother’s regular daily prayer, and Bible reading, I think God transformed Greta. As you read about Greta’s pilgrimage in the Reflection booklet, you will see how God nurtured her soul from merely keeping a list of lifelong endeavors which she thought would lead her to the Kingdom of heaven. Instead, by Greta’s thoughts and actions, she struck out on a limb for the betterment of God’s Kingdom wherever she lived. Sadly, her sojourn in this life has now concluded. We rejoice that my mother has attained the new life which she has yearned so long. She is now reunited with so many friends and family who have gone before her into greater glory. In heaven, may Greta experience what St. Paul once wrote, “For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face; now I know in part, but then I will know fully just as I also have been fully known” (1 Corinthians 13:12). In the words of the Collect for Ascension Day, may Greta’s spirit be “sent forth to the ends of the earth as heralds of repentance and witnesses of Jesus Christ, the firstborn from the dead, who lives with you now and always. Amen.” + Rest in peace, mother!

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Mary MacGregor
10 years ago

Christopher, I feel as if I understand your mother's spirit from your tribute. She was indeed a Godly women. I know you long to be at her memorial service. Rest in the assurance that she knows and is with you in spirit. I speak from first hand experience when I say that when we lose our mothers, it is only in the physical realm. A bit of their spirits live on in us and we never lose the chance to honor their memory through our faithful lives. May you and your family be comforted at this very difficult time.

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Dear Chris, We remember your mother with much affection and are saddened to hear of her death. We have a beautiful treasured remembrance of your mother which we have shared with many people both in Australia and around the world in our ministry. Your mother had invited us to a meal, lunch early in 1979 if I recall correctly, and we shared a warm time of fellowship with you and your mother. Following the meal your mother recounted the story of working in the rice fields with her mother, your grandmother, in China. As they worked in the rice fields your grandmother sang a special song and her daughter, your mother, sang along with her. Greta felt led to offer this song from China to encourage us as we left for the mission field in Argentina. I recall the humble and gracious way in which Greta asked if we would mind if she sang the song in Mandarin, as it was the language in which her mother sang and the language in which Greta herself had heard and learnt the song. Naturally we were excited and agreed. We have never forgotten the posture of adoration in which your mother stood to sing to her Lord. The sincerity of her worship and the power of the song affected us deeply. What was the song? Greta explained that it was Psalm 121 and the promise of the Psalm was true. It was true in her mother's life, in her life and it would be true in our life. This was an extraordinary occasion of encouragement from a saint to a young family setting off on a venture of faith in the Lord. The evening prior to our leaving for South America the Lord placed this Psalm on my heart as I prayed into the night. A week later in Lima, Peru, we were at the home of the leader of the university student work in South America. Following the meal, Samuel’s wife Lily Escobar felt led of the Lord to offer a song of praise. She asked if we minded if she sang it in Spanish as this was the language in which she had learnt the song. We were delighted and agreed. What was the song? I am sure you have guessed correctly! Yes, Psalm 121, the very song that your mother had offered in Mandarin! The Holy Spirit had inspired your mother to begin a ‘song chain of blessing’ for us. What joy in the family of Christ! What an amazing God we have! PTL! I am sure that we are not the only people who give thanks to God for Greta Lo, a woman of deep faith and trust in the Risen Christ. Please let us know of the date of your mother’s Memorial Service in order that we might pray for all who attend that they might hear of Greta Lo’s Lord, of the Lord of all creation, of the Risen Lord Jesus Christ and turn to and trust in Him. We pray that they too might sing or say Psalm 121 and say with Greta Lo, ‘My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth.’ Yours sincerely in the grace and love of Christ.

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My particular memory of your mother was the years she spent at Ridley College – she would come each Tuesday morning, when the old diploma-level ‘Bible set books’ were taught, and enjoy the lecture (she worked through 1&2 Samuel and Ezekiel with me, and would have done Deuteronomy and Isaiah 40-66, John, Galatians & James, 1&2 Corinthians and Acts over the years – she never sat for exams, but did the reading). Then she would come to chapel, spend time with students – she was a great encouragement to many from Asia – have lunch, read in the library and go home mid-afternoon. As well as that, of course, we often had phone calls, especially when she was worried, and shared meals – always very generous ones when she cooked, a good number of times!

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Joan Fyfe
10 years ago

The Harbour Lights Guild of The Mission to Seafarers, Sydney disbanded in 2010, but several of the ladies still met socially and held occasional street stalls. They also assisted with catering at various functions. Some members of the Missions’ staff and the Guild ladies still remember Greta very well. Occasionally, she telephoned one or two members and for many years, often spoke with me on a weekly basis. Greta’s husband, the Rev. Luther Lo, came to Australia to take up a position as Assistant Chaplain with The Missions to Seamen, NSW (as it was then known) and brought with him, Greta and their young son, Christopher. From the very beginning of their time in Sydney, Greta took an active role in the Guild. After Luther concluded his ministry in Sydney, the Lo family moved to Melbourne, where they lived until Luther’s death. Greta returned to Sydney in 1986, living at Goodwin Village in Woollahra. She also returned to the Guild and helped in whatever way she could. She is still remembered as a most cheerful and helpful long-time member. She always encouraged her friends to come to The Mission stalls to lend their support. Even when Greta lost her nerve to travel into the city, a symptom which nowadays plague many senior citizens, she kept a very keen interest in everyone and everything at the Mission. She will be remembered for a long time.

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Katherine Chiu
10 years ago

The Harbour Lights Guild of The Mission to Seafarers, Sydney disbanded in 2010, but several of the ladies still met socially and held occasional street stalls. They also assisted with catering at various functions. Some members of the Missions’ staff and the Guild ladies still remember Greta very well. Occasionally, she telephoned one or two members and for many years, often spoke with me on a weekly basis. Greta’s husband, the Rev. Luther Lo, came to Australia to take up a position as Assistant Chaplain with The Missions to Seamen, NSW (as it was then known) and brought with him, Greta and their young son, Christopher. From the very beginning of their time in Sydney, Greta took an active role in the Guild. After Luther concluded his ministry in Sydney, the Lo family moved to Melbourne, where they lived until Luther’s death. Greta returned to Sydney in 1986, living at Goodwin Village in Woollahra. She also returned to the Guild and helped in whatever way she could. She is still remembered as a most cheerful and helpful long-time member. She always encouraged her friends to come to The Mission stalls to lend their support. Even when Greta lost her nerve to travel into the city, a symptom which nowadays plague many senior citizens, she kept a very keen interest in everyone and everything at the Mission. She will be remembered for a long time.

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Katherine Chiu
10 years ago

My dear eldest sister Greta was a virtuous and caring person. She looked after our parents with filial respect and took good care of her younger siblings. Greta was generous and hospitable to her friends and acquaintances. Though we have not seen each other for decades, her love and care for me, the youngest of the family, did not change at all. Up until the day before she suffered that fatal fall, we would talk regularly on the phone. Both our parents came from traditionally large families. Ancestral worship was fervently practiced in our household. Nevertheless, our father believed in good education and was adamant that all his children should be sent to the best schools. In those days, the best schools were the mission schools. At the mission girls’ schools where she studied, my eldest sister Greta came to know the Lord and was baptized as a Christian. All of us went to the mission schools too and became Christians. At first, our parents were not happy about our baptism, but gradually, they changed their attitude under eldest sister’s influence and were converted to Christianity. We were blessed to have parents who treated sons and daughters as equals. All six of us developed a strong bond, and no matter whether we were near or far from each other, we cared for each other. After completing my secondary education, I entered nursing school upon my eldest sister’s advice. Greta was convinced that with professional training, I could be self-sustaining and financially independent. I was a shy and timid person and was unsure if I could manage a career in nursing. My passion, however, for this meaningful profession grew slowly, and I have never for a moment looked back. Consequently, I worked as a nurse until my retirement. I am thankful that I served many needy people in my life. I am indebted to my eldest sister for her support and encouragement. My eldest sister extended her love and care for family members and also to those around her. During the post-war years, Greta had helped refugees from Mainland China to find jobs and the destitute elderly to find a place in church-operated almshouses. She always went out of her way to help other people. A few years after her family moved to Australia, it was unfortunate that my brother-in-law suddenly passed away. My nephew Christopher was just twelve when he lost his father. With limited financial resources and support my eldest sister did her best to raise her son on her own. I always admired her perseverance and strength. This October, my eldest sister would have been ninety years old. I told her that I had purchased a special birthday card for her. She requested that I mail it early, not knowing whether she would live to see that day. That card had brightened her last days at Goodwin Village. My eldest sister left us on 13th May. I miss her so much! Yet, it is comforting to know that she is now relieved from a life of ill health and loneliness. She is now reunited with her husband, our parents and brother. May my eldest sister, rest in peace. You will always live in my memory!

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Chuanji Zhao
10 years ago

I miss my eldest sister Greta a great deal. She was very kind to me when I was a small child. Greta took me to movies, parks, and the Star Ferry Pier, where we watched people fish. Those were happy childhood memories which I will never forget. After I completed high school, my eldest sister encouraged me to be trained as a nurse at the Methodist Hospital in Foshan, Guongdong Province, China. Our youngest sister joined me a year later. Sadly, with the liberation of China in 1949 and the subsequent rise of political conflicts, we were separated from the rest of our family in Hong Kong. I lived in Mainland China with my husband and children while my eldest sister lived in Hong Kong and later immigrated to Australia with my brother-in-law and nephew. For over five decades, we could only keep in touch through correspondence. It was in the year 2000, the year of the Sydney Olympic Games, when I finally saw my eldest sister Greta again. The date was 3rd September. We were overjoyed at this reunion. We laughed at childhood reminiscences and shared our life stories. Alas, that meeting was also to be our last. I will always remember that day! Now my sister does not have to suffer anymore from pain and illness. She is enjoying the happy reunion with our parents, our brother and her husband. May she Rest in Peace. I will always remember her.

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Luji Zhao
10 years ago

A Letter to my beloved Sister Wai Dear Sister Wai, I called you a few days ago. As usual, you talked loudly and quickly. You didn’t mention your discomfort at all. You just shared with me how much you appreciated the medical team who were taking care of you. You kept reassuring me that people around you were kind and caring. It seemed to me that you still had much more to say. I was a little concerned that you were too tired. Thus I said goodbye and hung up so you may rest for a while. I thought I would call again later in the week. I didn’t anticipate that you would leave us in such a short time. As you said, you committed everything into God’s hands and you then departed peacefully. I still had more news to share with you, but alas, you will not be able to hear me in this life. Since my early childhood, you were so kind to me and always stretched out your helping hands. I still remember clearly that during summer time, you took us to the playground or the waterfront at Tsim Sha Tsui to see the fishermen casting their nets. You brought so much joy to my childhood. I was not an outstanding student. Whenever there was some improvement in my grades, even a small one, you encouraged me. When I graduated from the primary school, I once received an award and scholarship. You were so excited for me and kept praising me all the way home. Then, I did not quite understand why you were more excited than me! Now, it seems, your encouragement has paid off. For even in my senior years, I still enjoy studying, and this love of learning, has permeated my life! After high school, I was worried about my future. Our parents were not able to support me for tertiary education. Yet, you were able to find me a job and lodgings in Guangzhou, where you had been a college student. As I enjoyed your company, I was not too frightened when I started my very first job. I was even able to confidently self-study and prepare for my university’s entrance examinations. During the summer months, you helped me to find jobs so that I could save up some money for my tuition fees. When I had a tumor, you took care of me and arranged treatment. Because of your loving care, I was able to quickly recover and returned to school in good time. Everything you did for me, you just did it quietly. I do not think that I could have completed my university study without your help. Since I graduated from the university in 1951, I had not seen you for some sixty years. After the 1949 revolution, we did not write to each other for some thirty years. Yet, you were always on my mind. I only knew of your situation and re-connected with you during the 1980s. It is my regret that we were never able to meet again before you left this life. May you Rest in Peace. Your voice and smile will always echo in my heart.

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Kim Yue
10 years ago

Despite the fact that my elder sister Greta had a tiny frame, she was a born leader. She was clever, eloquent, sociable and hospitable. She seldom had a spare penny in her pocket! In the old days when we were still young, on the weekends, she always invited her friends to our home. It seemed very easy for Greta to make friends! Greta was outgoing but never enjoyed engaging in the painstaking needlework in which our mother excelled. I used to spend time with our mother doing embroidery or sewing while Greta spent time chatting with her friends! When our mother gave us some pocket money, my elder sister would take me and our younger sisters to watch movies. We always bought one ticket only for every two persons and saved the remaining money for snacks. In those days, the people in the movie theater didn’t really mind. When Greta and I were still young, the family business necessitated our family to move from Fatsan in Guongdong Province, south-east China; to live, for a few years, in Dalian, Liaoning Province, in north-east China. During this time, Greta learned Mandarin and became the ‘spokesperson’ for the family. Our parents’ broken Mandarin was inadequate for business transaction purposes. Between us, she possessed the best language skills. Unlike most of his contemporaries, our father treated sons and daughters as equals. We all received a good education. Our father was especially keen to see his daughters being well educated. He always told us that even if a girl was married, she would never know her future fate. For him, it was therefore important that a girl could, if necessary, be able to maintain a self-sustaining life. For that reason, all the Chiu girls were sent to all-girls’ mission schools. I used to walk to school with my elder sister. Our mother would send a maid to chaperone us. My elder sister also brought me to the Baptist Church on Hillwood Road, which was not far from our home. One day, we were all baptized without having first received permission from our parents. Later on, our parents became Christians too. My elder sister went to Mainland China when Hong Kong was occupied by the Japanese during the Pacific War. She continued her study at Sun Yat-sen University. During this time, she met her future husband Luther Lo, who was a youth worker for the YMCA, and a fellow student who attended the neighboring Lingnan University (a private university founded by American missionaries). When World War II ended, my elder sister returned to Hong Kong and worked as a primary school teacher; first at the Gold & Silver Exchange Society Free School, and then at St. Stephen’s College Preparatory School, where her husband served as the Headmaster. Greta and Luther later immigrated to Australia where my brother-in-law was appointed a chaplain with the Mission for Seafarers. Greta’s husband’s premature death was a great blow to her. As a strong-willed woman, however, she never gave up. My sister had a harsh life. Now she is in God’s presence, I am happy for her. May she Rest in Peace.

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Winnie Yu
10 years ago

Greta had been instrumental in starting a ministry to Indo-Asian refugees who, on arrival in the late 70s and early 80s, were mostly placed by the Government in the housing commission flats in North Richmond, Melbourne. Greta helped out in the Friendship Group based at St Matthias Anglican Church, North Richmond, whose aim was to extend friendship to these new arrivals. Many of the refugees knew very little English and had to attend English classes. The Friendship Group invited these students for morning tea which was held once every month. This was hosted by ladies from both St. Matthias’ Church and St John’s Church, in Toorak. The morning tea provided an opportunity for the new arrivals to practice English and to make friends with the locals. Unfortunately, both the hosts and the students were often shy. Greta, however, with her outgoing personality, helped bridge the gap. Her language and social skills, compassion and empathy helped her quickly became an important link between the two. She acted both as host and interpreter, and followed up some of the ‘students’ with home visits. By the time I joined her in early 1980s, she had already established close friendships with quite a few families. Greta introduced me to them and on a few occasions, we went visiting together. Two years later, Greta retired and I carried on. I first started a Youth Group and later, a Bible Study Group. This ministry subsequently developed into the present ‘new’ St Matthias’ Chinese Congregation presently served by three ordained Anglican ministers and myself as the Authorised Lay Minister. Incidentally, the Chinese congregation of St Matthias will be celebrating its 25th Anniversary this August. Since Greta’s retirement, she had kept in close contact with me, often with very long telephone conversations. It was not uncommon for the phone calls to last more than an hour. Greta was always very keen to learn of every detail about the development of St Matthias’, about my ministry there, about Victor my husband, who subsequently was ordained and joined the Pastoral team at St Matthias. Greta’s move to Sydney in 1986 did not deter her from making these lengthy telephone calls. She made use of the weekend call offer which allowed her to make a 2-hour national call for only $1. St Matthias’ had always been very close to her heart. There is no doubt in my mind that she had been faithfully praying for us all these years, and for that I am very grateful. It had not been easy for Greta to have been widowed so young, and had reared Christopher in Australia, away from the support of her relatives in Hong Kong. She missed her dear husband very much and often reminded me to cherish my time with Victor. In nearly every conversation, Greta would remind me of the number of years she had been a widow. Now that her life’s journey has come to an end, she must be so delighted to be able to join her husband in heaven. Greta had been faithful all her life. She had kept her faith and finished the race. I rejoice with her for a life well lived: as a devoted and supportive wife, a loving and sacrificial mother, a faithful worker for Christ and a good caring friend.

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Dr. Greta Hague
10 years ago

In 1959, after our five years in Hong Kong, my husband Eric and I returned to England. Eric was invited to be the Vicar of Christ Church, Woking, in Surrey. While there, the Rev. Luther and Mrs. Greta Lo, whom we had known in Hong Kong, came to England for some post-ordination training. Eric invited Luther to be his Curate, and they stayed with us in the Vicarage. I had just had my third son, Philip, and Greta Lo was expecting her first baby. So we had a great time together. While Luther entered into all the Parish Activities, playing cricket with the Youth Fellowship, The “two Gretas” ran the “Mother’s Union,” and helped in the Sunday School, etc. Greta’s baby was eventually born and at the Christening, I was asked to be his God mother. We were sorry when Greta and Luther’s time in England was up, and they had to return to Hong Kong. Greta Lo was always so gentle and kind. She was a real support to her husband and a real witness for her Saviour Jesus Christ our Lord. Much love, Godmother Greta.

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Pat Newth
10 years ago

Dear Chris, I remember when you, your mum and dad came to Australia. At age six, you were then the youngest pupil ever to have enrolled at St Andrew’s Cathedral School. I remember fondly the times I visited your home. Your mum was so hospitable; we enjoyed many lovely meals and fun times. In your early days, I enjoyed my family’s fellowship with your family at your residence in the Missions to Seamen. At Chinese New Year time, your mum always gave a new coin to all of us, including my dad’s grandchildren. She never forgot birthdays and Christmas. At those times, we always received from her, beautiful cards. Your mum was a very committed Christian, and she never missed services at St Andrew’s Cathedral. Every Sunday, she faithfully attended the 8:00 am service and then helped out at morning teas. Later on in years when she could not get to the Cathedral, my dad always received a weekly phone call from her wanting to know all the latest news of our family as well as from the Cathedral. Unfortunately in recent years my family did not get to see your mum. Both my parents were not well and consequently, we did not venture out very much. We did, however, still keep up by phone. Every best wish

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Christopher Lo
10 years ago

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Christopher Lo
10 years ago

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Christopher Lo
10 years ago

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Christopher Lo
10 years ago

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Christopher Lo
10 years ago

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Christopher Lo
10 years ago

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Pak-Ho Kam
10 years ago

Kam Pak-ho, one of Greta’s former students; Vancouver, B. C., Canada I will miss you forever, teacher! Whenever I picked up the phone, there often came a familiar voice, “is this Kam speaking?” “Yes it is. How are you Miss Chiu?” “Kam, please don’t call me Miss Chiu, as though I am still your teacher. I’m now one of your ‘fellow students’ of life. I have much to learn from you. Haha…” For decades, we began our long distance calls in this manner. No matter whether I called her, or the fact that it was mostly Greta who called to inquire after my family members, this familiar banter was our common exchange. Even now at middle age, I feel blessed to have had such a caring senior citizen in my life. Sadly though, we won’t have any more of those conversations. Back in 1951, Mrs. Greta Lo was my second grade class teacher at the Gold & Silver Exchange Society Free School. By then, Mrs. Lo, or Miss Chiu as we addressed her, was in her twenties and was a very cheerful and passionate teacher. She was friendly to the students, and guided them with much patience and love. I was a trouble maker among my fellow students and I often received criticism and punishment from my other teachers. To my surprise, Mrs. Lo gave me the best comment I had ever received in my report card! Ever since, I have been very grateful to her for her kindness and forgiving heart! As my school required all class teachers to visit every student at least once, Mrs. Lo paid a visit to my home. I remembered she stayed for a long time at our home and talked with my mother. I was very scared that she would tell my mother about my bad behavior in school. Mrs. Lo, however, said nothing bad about me at all! I was very touched by her generous gesture and simultaneously felt both a sense of grace and shame. I respected Mrs. Lo a great deal, but unfortunately, 1951 was my last year to be her student. A year later, Mrs. Lo took up a teaching post with St. Stephen’s College Preparatory School and she later migrated to Sydney, Australia. Subsequently, I moved to Canada, and we didn’t see one another for sixty years! Despite the geographical distance between us, we kept in touch over the years until she passed away. Mrs. Lo was a committed Christian and she always told me that God would take care of everything. She accepted the fate of life as it occurred and thus kept a positive outlook towards all adversities. Shortly after she moved to Australia, Mrs. Lo’s husband died and she was left behind with a young son in a foreign land. It was indeed amazing to have witnessed the power of her faith and to have heard how she overcame hardship. Whenever I face any difficult times, I always draw faith from remembering our conversations and Mrs. Lo’s experiences. Now Mrs. Lo has finished her eighty-nine years life’s journey and is reunited with the Rev. Luther Lo in heaven. Her departure placed an earthly end to our deep friendship, but I will never forget her love and care towards me and my family. I miss you forever Miss Chiu!!

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Christopher Lo
10 years ago