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Anonymous
8 years ago

David came to live with my family as a child for years.. I was VERY VERY young.. but do have fond memories of him.. I remember him reading stories to me.. taking me to the tennis court..which he loved and was AWESOME AT!! And making the BEST pancakes with butter and sugar:))).. His name to me was "Da-wood".. he will always be remembered.. he was a sweet man and his daughter looks JUST like him!!! Lota of love to u Shannon and your lil one..

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Amy Wright
10 years ago

My favorite memories of Dave include sharing our musical tastes with "Hey, listen to this...", him doing "The Worm" at his wedding, breaking out the the "Mach 6" razor, dancing to "Maniac" at parties or when he brought his guitar to our social gatherings with the Virology Gang. Although it is silly, probably my favorite memory of Dave happened when he had a mental image of a mutual friend in a compromising position while wearing hockey gear. Just the very thought sent him into a fit of laughter that sent tears from his eyes and food from his mouth and almost sent him into a rose bush. Needless to say, alcohol was involved. After Fiona was born, our partying days weren't over, just changed so that it included that beautiful little girl. He was such a great Dad. I will miss Dave especially when I go visit Shannon and Fiona at their house.

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Dave and Fiona
10 years ago

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Dave and Fiona
10 years ago

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Brian Brajcich
11 years ago

I am Dave’s nephew and have known him for just about as long as I can remember. My earliest memories of Dave date back to the time when he was a student at the University of Washington, living in my grandma’s house. When I was over at my grandma’s house, there was nothing I loved more than hanging out with Dave, and he made it feel as though there was nothing he enjoyed more than hanging out with me. I particularly remember playing the video game “Metroid” with him in my grandma’s basement. We would take turns playing, trying to help each other find our way through the maze of tunnels that made up the planet Zebes. Dave always had a way of making you feel great about yourself, no matter what you were doing. He would always tell me how amazed he was by my ability to navigate through the game, and to a ten year old, that was just about the best compliment you could give. As I was growing up, Dave played an important role in my life as a friend and a mentor. When I was in high school, Dave introduced me to classic rock and guitar music. He took me to the store to help me pick out my first guitar, and taught me how to play. Over the years, I have maintained a strong interest in music, and largely attribute that to Dave’s influence. Dave has also always been there to give me advice about just about anything I needed. Recently, after I graduated from college, I was looking for work and Dave suggested that I come over to his house regularly to talk to him. While I was there, he would give me advice and encouragement whenever I felt discouraged. Of course, he would also try to convince me how I someday will learn to appreciate the intricacies of Opeth (a death metal band), and to explain why the Huskies weren’t really as bad as they seemed. The last time I saw Dave was this past January. I went over to his house with Patrick (my cousin) to visit him and catch up since I have been away at school. We ended up going to Best Buy so Dave could pick out some new speakers for his birthday present. After looking through the speakers, Dave ended up changing his mind about what to buy, and instead purchased an electronic keyboard because he thought that Fiona would enjoy it. I think that memory does a great job of summarizing what Dave meant to me. He was always putting others before himself, and always looking for ways to encourage children in their pursuits. I’m going to miss having him around, and I know I’m not the only one. God bless you Dave, and thank you for everything you’ve done for me.

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Brian Kvistad
11 years ago

Shannon and I were school-mates for the fourteen years of preschool through high school. Since I didn't drive in high school, Shannon was often my ride, and I remember logging many miles in the passenger seat of her little white Honda to a thousand different places. One day, I rode along as she took a side trip into the mysterious labyrinth of streets north of the UW campus in order to stop by Dave's fraternity. I could tell then that this was a very important person to her. She was clearly smitten, in a way I'd never seen before. As soon as I actually met Dave, I could see that he was a good catch for Shannon. He was a real gentleman, and he took an immediate interest in me whenever we were together. Then life post-college came along and we saw less and less of each other, though whenever we did, I always enjoyed Dave's calm, listening presence. Reading some of the other memories of Dave here, I am struck by how true to my experience they all seem. I spent very little time with Dave, yet when I read about his passion for music and sports, his enthusiastic encouragement of others, his genuine interest in others' talents and skills, I can honestly say that that was exactly how I remember him. Dave did offer me many guitar lessons, always encouraged me to sing (which I still do every night to my kids), and helped me to listen to music in a way that I never will forget: Have you ever listened to the complex rhythms of "Satellite," by the Dave Matthews Band? I mean REALLY LISTENED? Try to clap along sometime. It's crazy! Have you ever stopped and--WAIT hush, quiet! this part coming up--listened to the drum solos of Neil Peart? How many different drum beats is that in one measure? No! Shut up! Listen! That's so Dave. Having spent so little time with Dave, I feel gratified to know now how much of a real picture I got of him in so short a time. He really was a good man, and it breaks my heart to think that Shannon and Fiona have to miss him now. My last memory of Dave is from what was probably my last visit to his home many years back. I believe Shannon and my wife, Jennell, were inside visiting, and Dave and I were on the back porch. Dave, knowing I had a half-decent singing voice and at least some willingness to use it, had grabbed his guitar and pounced on the opportunity to have me sing with his guitar. We were doing that oh-so-typical thing of trying to think of songs to sing. At one point, stumped as usual, one of us saw an empty Clementine tangerine box near the recycling bin, and so we started to sing "Oh My Darlin' Clementine" as well as we knew how (which wasn't very well). (This was before the ubiquity of Google, so we couldn't pull up the lyrics in a snap.) I now own a small grocery, and the five-pound boxes of Clementines are nearing the end of their season. How fitting, I think, that Dave's death will always coincide with the Clementine season. As I watch them sell down, I always think of Dave, and that moment on his deck, and the way he was always passionately hunting for a way to take part in the music of the world.

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Marilyn Richter
11 years ago

My deepest condolences to Dave's family. Dave was a kind and thoughtful man. I knew him as a teacher and algebra coach, as well as Kathleen's brother. I went back to school as an adult to get my Bachelor's degree. It had been many years since high school algebra, and was having a difficult time getting through my classes. Kathleen suggested Dave as a tutor for me to help me prepare for my first test of the quarter. He was so patient, kind, and a wonderful teacher. He treated me with respect, and gave me a new confidence. Dave taught me different ways of seeing things, and helped me understand things in a new light. I continued to work with him for the rest of the quarter. Not only did he help me with my algebra, but I got an A in the class. I went on to get my Master's degree, in part due to his wonderful tutoring during my under-grad. Dave made an undeniable difference in my life. I will always be appreciative of his kindness and willingness to share his knowledge with the world. I will keep his family and friends in my thoughts.

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Nancy Aguda
11 years ago

I knew Dave through Shannon! She always would talk about how Dave adored his daughter Fiona! She would share photos at work of how Dave would proudly cuddle his daughter ! Dave, although your time on this earth was so short, you have given your family especially Fiona the most important gift a parent can give their child. ,THE GIFT of TIME And LOVE! Fiona is very lucky to have that moment with you! I am sure Shannon and Fiona will always keep you safe in their heart.

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Nancy Aguda
11 years ago

I knew Dave through Shannon! She always would talk about how Dave adored his daughter Fiona! She would share photos at work of how Dave would proudly cuddle his daughter ! Dave, although your time on this earth was so short, you have given your family especially Fiona the most important gift a parent can give their child. ,THE GIFT of TIME And LOVE! Fiona is very lucky to have that moment with you! I am sure Shannon and Fiona will always keep you safe in their heart.

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Martha Yezlek
11 years ago

It is incredibly sad that David’s life ended so soon and I cannot put into words how sad I am to know that he is no longer with us. I met David 21 years ago when I came to the US for a medical treatment and stayed with his family Anne and Jim. During my stay with the Anderson family, I remembered how much he loved football game, hanged out with his friends and played with his cousin Hamilton Anderson; he was a big brother anyone could wish for. I was able to reconnect with the Anderson and David and I once received an e-mail from David and after reading his e-mail, I was so mesmerized by the fact that he turned out to be a wonderful person; kindhearted, motivating, positive minded, responsible young man with a great sense of family values which is rare now days. In his e-mail, he introduced Shannon to me and he spoke highly of her, that e-mail of his assured me that he had a peace of mind. I so much wished to see him this year; however I shall cherish his good advice and remember him forever.

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Colleen
11 years ago

Dave and I shared a number of common interests. Among these are a love of children, music, and mathematics. I felt like he always expressed admiration for me that was more than I deserved, but it was just the kind of person that he was. He had a genuine interest in each of my children and was always interested in helping them in any way he could, whether it be giving guitar lessons, assisting with coaching Kaitlyn’s basketball team, or encouraging them in music or watching them on stage. They always sought his company at family gatherings and got such a kick out of him that I heard countless Dave stories when we returned home. Dave thrived on helping others. Although Dave had plenty of his own struggles surrounding employment during the economic downturn, he invited my son Brian over weekly, encouraging him to not give up in his search for an interim job until he could achieve his dream of attending medical school. This was a big turning point for Brian’s life and I will forever be thankful to Dave for his role. I suggested Dave for tutoring children I knew who were struggling with math. Their parents marveled at his gift for seeing the positive in their children and inspiring them to be their best. He sometimes worked a little guitar lesson time in with the math. One of my good friends had recently lost her husband and was butting heads with her 4th grade daughter on math homework. Dave had such wonderful things to tell my friend about her daughter that she told me she wondered if they were talking about the same child. He had an incredible patience that I did not have. A couple of years ago, I learned just how much Dave enjoyed math as a hobby and how he was considering an actuarial career. I was not sure how he was going to do this since I knew caring for Fiona was a full time job and I had taken the actuarial exams before I had any children myself and knew just what a challenge this would be. I shared some of my probability resources with him and he was so excited he could not wait to start studying. Meanwhile, I increased my involvement with math enrichment at my children’s elementary school and when Dave was able to work it into his schedule, he would come to help out. I think this time was one of the highlights of his week and he took his commitment very seriously. When circumstances prevented his attendance, he was so profusely apologetic. When I told him I understood his conflict, he told me how thankful he was for our conversation. The night before he died we discussed plans for the next day’s math club meeting. Knowing what a big fan he was of sports, I told him we could wait and talk during Superbowl half-time. He said he would love to talk whenever and once we started he did not seem to want to stop. About the time that I was due to meet him at Math Club that next day, I received the phone call from my father telling me of his sudden death. It sent a pain through my heart, not only because of the loss to Shannon and Fiona, but because of my own loss of someone who had touched my life with such love and selflessness.

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Kayleen Hooley
11 years ago

Hi, I’m Dave’s niece Kayleen. What I am about to share is really a reflection of thoughts and stories from the entire O’Meara family, thank you everyone for all of your kind words. This was both the easiest and the hardest eulogy to write at the same time. I first met Dave 19 years ago, I was 5 years old at the time, and I don't remember all the details, but I do remember him coming in and not only sweeping Shannon off her feet but all of us nieces and nephews as well, really the whole family. He soon moved into Grandma’s house, in Kathleen’s old room. I remember at Grandmas, all of us cousins would wait every morning for the time when we were allowed to wake Dave up. When it was time we would go running into his room and jump all over him. Of course he made us feel like this was the best part of his day! He didn't make us feel like little kids, he made us feel like we were important and like we really mattered. He was on the same level as us, He valued everything we said and let us know that we were all so important in our own individual way. He was so invested in his nieces and nephews, whether that be coaching our basketball team, building a snowman, helping us out with homework, or carving a pumpkin. And I’m pretty sure we have all received at least one guitar lesson from Dave. One of Daves greatest passions was music. Dave loved all music and he liked his music LOUD. He loved to listen but he really loved to play. I remember thinking that he was a rock star. He also seemed to have a limitless capacity to store knowledge, especially when it came to music. Kathleen tells stories of when she went to Yellowstone with Dave, Shannon, Michael and Kerry that Dave would entertain them in the car by asking trivia questions about whatever song would happen to be playing and then entertain them playing his guitar by the campfire, first by taking requests and then by making up songs and lyrics about that days events. Dave was known for his impromptu musician skills… Dave's other passion in life was sports and I mean any and all sports, he was a gifted athlete and extremely competitive. He also had a knack for improvising. One time at work he turned a piece of plywood into a ping pong table with toilet paper as the net, made paddles out of cardboard and got everyone playing. His manager eventually bought a real ping-pong table, and Dave went on to win the ultimate office ping pong championship and was crowned the coveted title "The Ponginator". He used to spend hours at a time with us kids in the O'Meara basement making up games. On the fly he would make up rules, invent a rich history, fictional past, great players, hall of fame and former champions. Michael always referred to this as “Dave ball”. Whether we were playing a game of floor hockey in the basement, or throwing a ball outside, he would always find something very small and specific to complement us on, I think Dave was the only person that has ever been able to compare me, the girl who still hasn't broken in her first softball mitt she got 15 years ago, to Ken Griffey Jr. He did this with total sincerity and passion. Win or lose you could not help but feeling GREAT about yourself. This is the effect that Dave had on everyone. I don’t think I will ever meet someone who has such genuine appreciation for life and such a caring heart. One of my favorite stories is when from some holiday when I was little, and I was eagerly awaiting the arrival of Shannon and Dave. They showed up a few minutes late, and Shannon apologized, explaining that there had been an earthworm in the driveway that Dave had to be sure not to run over. This was Dave. Every little detail was important, especially in people. He saw beauty in you that you didn’t even know was there, he would recognize it, and somehow make a little piece of you believe it. Just one conversation with him would make me feel like I am on top of the world, and I know this echoes what many of you have shared as well. I really believe finding beauty in everyone and everything is what gave Dave life, and filled him with so much spirit. Dave's third and greatest passion was Shannon. Dave and Shannon had that rarest of things, True Love. They knew it from the very beginning. Shannon warned her brother Michael right before he met Dave, "He's the man of my dreams, so please be nice to him." From then, it was always Dave AND Shannon, one word, one name. They complimented each other so well and so effortlessly that it brought a joy to anyone around them. It was, it is, the truest, deepest, most passionate of all loves I know. Theirs was the kind of love that launched ships and started wars. This kind of Love does not die. People who have experienced True Love become different, they know things, they know a special world that not everybody knows. It wraps around them like an invisible cloak and will be with them, with you Shannon, for the rest of your life. It is a gift really. More than a gift, it is a grace. Shannon you were the best wife anyone could have wished for, Dave to was truly blessed to have you, and you him. Dave had another great passion, and she arrived about 3 years ago, her name is Fiona Marie. This time I know it was love at first sight. He showered Fiona with limitless love, teaching her about everything in the world around her. I especially remember this during diaper changes. They would frequently talk about outer space and stars. If Fiona turns out to be an astronomer, I’ll know why! Remember how I said Dave could see the beauty in everyone? Now multiple that by a million and you will begin to see what wonder he saw in Fiona. From the very beginning Dave knew Fiona was a prodigy drummer, by the rhythm of her kicks, a prodigy singer, by the tone of her first sounds, and a prodigy dancer by her first steps. Her drawings were always priceless works of art. He saved and cherished save every last scribbled on napkin or scrap of paper. Fiona will always know that she has a daddy who loves her. Shannon and Fiona will always be “Dave’s girls”. Dave had confidence that things were going to get better. Yet even when things did get rough, Dave always could see the light and joy in the dark. He didn't fret over the little things that really don't matter. He focused on people, getting to know them and sharing a little of himself with everyone. And now it will be our turn to share Dave with each other, but especially with Fiona. We each have a role to play, some of them are not yet written. But for now, Grandpa John you can share your love of music, laughter, ice cream, and Mr. Bean. Grandma Kay, your complete awesomeness. For anyone else who knows Grandma, you know there is no better way to describe her. Aunts and uncles, continue share your love, support and guidance. And for us, Dave’s Nieces and nephews, and Fiona’s cousins, we need to bring back the cousin slumber party at the Hamilton house, in honor of Uncle Dave, a reunion once a year (if that's ok with you Shannon), play music invent really silly games, and share all of the joy and wisdom Dave had shared with us. Who else is going to teach Fiona to Eat toast upside down to taste the butter first, Wear her socks inside out so they are more comfortable, Cut the tongues out of her shoes so that they “breathe better”, wear glasses with no lenses because the frames absorb just enough light, or to stick her pinky out and speak with a British accent when she wants to fancy? Dave--I know you are listening--we, your friends and family, all love you, and cherish the time we had with you. Thank you for sharing your life and love with us while you were here, and thank you for continuing to share your love and joy in our hearts. You will always be part of our family. We miss you, but we take comfort in knowing that we have a guardian angel.

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Connie Arnold
11 years ago

Although I met David on a professional level as I helped with cleaning and organizing the home, I consider him to be a friend too. I have never met someone more kind and generous. We often talked of my son's interest in sports and music and he ALWAYS offered to share everything he knew on the subjects. Even taking a good part of a day to email my son with all kinds of information on drummers and their styles. I observed David as a father to Fiona as I worked around the house and was amazed at his patience and care. (all this during those often "terrible twos" as they are said to be). He made me want to be a more loving person. What better legacy can one leave?

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11 years ago

This has taken me forever to write, for how do you sum up the life of someone like Dave in the space of a few paragraphs? Plus every time I sit down to compose something, I lose my composure as I realize again that Dave is gone. But here's my best effort. By now you've all shared a lot about the kind of person Dave was, and done so more eloquently than I could. But I wanted to add my memories and those of my kids of our time with Dave. When I asked Anna about Uncle Dave, she recounted the time that he taught her how to play the left-hand part of "Heart and Soul" when he noticed that she was just learning to play the piano. "Heart and Soul" sums up Dave pretty well, I think. Kyle remembers time spent at grandma's house, cracking up (for the hundredth time) on the couch as he watched Mr. Bean with his cousins and Uncle Dave who perhaps laughed even louder than the rest. He was also in awe that Uncle Dave was the ONLY ONE that could beat ALL the levels on grandma's Super Mario on the Nintendo 64. Lauren's fondness for Uncle Dave showed in the fact that whenever she heard of a family gathering, her first question was, "Is Uncle Dave going?" She loved the deep discussions they had and how he talked to her on the same level, sharing interesting info on a wide variety of subjects they both enjoyed. She'd often share these facts on the way home, "Uncle Dave told me that...." or, "Did you know...." For myself, I remember too many things that made Dave special to put them all down, but here goes. I remember the way he always had a kind word for everyone, the way he cared so deeply about and saw the best in everyone, the way he was always interested in how you were or what you had to say and how he never complained. I remember the way he loved Fiona in a million little gestures and how he loved Shannon in a million more. The kids loved the thought of Uncle Dave as "Tao", but now somehow it seems prophetic. He was the yin to Shannon's yang, he showed us the "way" of kindness and he guided Fiona on the "path" of life. Dave was such a fountain of wisdom on so many things mathematical, scientific, musical and more. And he shared his love of those things with so many, whether it was through tutoring, teaching or just talking. The last time I saw Dave was at our Super Bowl party the night before he died. Once again, he amazed me by siting football facts so arcane, that if it wasn't Dave saying them, I would have thought they were just made up, for how could anyone fit so many things in their brain? But Dave could. And I loved the fact that when a Stevie Wonder ad came on during the game, everyone said it wasn't the real Stevie Wonder in the ad. Dave was the only one to say with absolute certainty that it was the real Stevie Wonder. I googled it and Dave was right. Dave knew his music inside and out. But that's not all Dave knew. He knew not just how to be a kind, sensitive, loving husband to Shannon, but also an incredible daddy to Fiona. He showered Fiona with limitless love, teaching her about everything in the world around her. I think in the three years since Fiona was born, Dave probably spent more time with her one-on-one than many dads spend in the space of an entire childhood. I think he was destined to be home with her. I am reminded of this constantly by pictures: Dave reading to her, taking her to the beach, on a scooter ride....and if you know our family, you know there are many more pictures that capture his love for both her and Shannon. Each time I look at a picture of him, it makes me feel that he's just around the corner or in the next room or coming to the next family event. How I wish that was true. But what I do know is true is that Dave's memory lives on in all of us, and he may not be just around the corner, but he's still with us in spirit, and looking down on Shannon and Fiona and sending them love and strength

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Colleen
11 years ago

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11 years ago

I knew David must be a pretty special guy when I found out he had moved into my old bedroom in my parents’ home while he was attending college. From the beginning it was obvious he adored Shannon, loved music & sports, and had a great appetite for my Mom’s cooking. Dave was a fun loving guy and soon became a part of the O’Meara family. One of my fond memories of spending time with Dave was on a trip to Yellowstone in 2002. Included on the trip were Dave, Shannon, my brother Michael and his wife Kerry. It was a treat for me because having moved out of the family home when Michael & Shannon were very young; I hadn’t been on family vacations with them. On the trip I learned of Dave’s love for music…ALL kinds of music. We would be in the car listening to rock-n-roll, heavy metal, then the blues… even Gallic melodies. We would play music trivia and Dave was usually able to tell us the “who, what, when, where & how” of everything surrounding the songs. I have great memories of sitting out on a deck overlooking the Yellowstone River at dusk with Dave playing away on his guitar. As entertainment, he would make up melodies and sing funny lyrics about the adventures we had experienced during the day. He had us all laughing out loud. When Fiona was born, Dave found himself in his greatest role as a father. At first he was concerned with the great responsibility of taking care of her each day as a stay at home Dad. He was quick to become comfortable with an infant and became an incredible father. One thing about Dave, he was a person who “took time to stop and smell the roses”. Life was for living, and that he did. I quietly watched him one day as he was walking and holding Fiona. He would stop and pause to look and marvel at something in nature. He would then patiently explain to Fiona something she had not seen before and what it was. Dave was able to see the small details in his surroundings much in the way a small child does. So many of us ignore the present, as we rush through life “trying to get things done”. I’ll always be so very grateful that Dave “took time to smell the roses” and shower his love on my sister Shannon and their daughter Fiona. I will truly miss you Dave and feel so blessed you have been a member of our family.

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Sonia Pawlak
11 years ago

I first met David and Shannon through a Music Together class I attended with my son Lars. I was immediately drawn to David due to his love of music, beautiful baritone voice and his ability to not only to enjoy the moment with his daughter Fiona and but also enjoy the joy of others around him in the class. In the short time that I knew David, I learned that he had knowledge of many things, many interests and talents (truly "a one man city") and held great appreciation for the arts. He was a kind and caring soul and will be very much missed in our community.

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Scott Johnson
11 years ago

I have lived in Nebraska for most of my life. Shannon and her brothers and sisters have lived in Washington. We are first cousins. I have only seen them a handful of times in my 50 years. However, they have always been special to me. Thanks to Facebook, even though Shannon is the youngest, I have become very close to her and can tell her anything. I did not get the opportunity to know Dave because of the Distance from each other. But, if he married Shannon, he was obviously a wonderful, terrific man. Fiona? What a sweetheart!

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Patricia Bacus
11 years ago

My husband and I will keep your family in our prayers. We were so sorry to hear about your loss. You and Dave are the age of our children. Dave sounds like a wonderful husband and father. You were blessed to have him in your lives. love Aunt Patricia (Marx) Bacus and John Bacus

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11 years ago

I first met Dave when Shannon invited him over to Mom and Dad's house.  I was sitting in the basement practicing the guitar when Shannon came to warn me that she was bringing someone special over.  She said "He's the man of my dreams, so please be nice to him."  I think it was really important to her that we hit it off.  Of course, in a short period of time we did.   From the beginning, Dave was like a brother.  We enjoyed many of the same things; playing music and sports together.  Like myself, Dave had a strong, competitive streak that drove him.  However, he always played fair and was quick to give his opponent credit.  Anytime you played with Dave, he'd analyze you and afterwards provide a comprehensive critique of your performance.  So with guitar, he'd comment on how your note choices reminded him of Jimmy Page's or with tennis he'd mention that your baseline play had elements of Pete Sampras.  That was Dave's nature.  He really enjoyed making others feel good about themselves.  He wasn't talking in platitudes either.   He'd find the most specific, subtle things you had done and comment on it.  Dave lived in the moment, and gave you his complete attention. Dave's nieces and nephews picked up on this as well.  They naturally gravitated towards his warm, gentle, engaging spirit.  There were many family events spent in the basement with Dave inventing a new sport.  I like to call these "Dave Ball".  The sport lasted but a day, yet included intricate rules and a colorful history.  Dave imagined all of this for the entertainment of his young friends.  He was so at ease playing with children.  I think he slipped into their world each time and didn't see himself as an adult playing with children.  He was one of them, having just as much fun as they were.  He'd find a way to make each one of them feel special.   I have many good memories of time spent with Dave;  road trips to the Gorge to catch a concert, camping on Orcas Island, a trip to Yellowstone when I turned 30, jamming on the guitar with the band, Dave and Dad chuckling while watching a silly movie.  They are some of the best times of my life and Dave was a big part of that.   More recently I've enjoyed talking to Dave about our common experience in fatherhood.  His nurturing qualities really shown through with his beautiful daughter, Fiona Marie.  They would light up in each others presence. Dave's concern for others touched me personally in recent months.  In one of my last conversations with Dave, he expressed how truly grateful he was that my son's health had shown signs of improving after a long illness.  The concern that he expressed was so heartfelt and honest.  He talked about how you never really know what might happen, and that you have to live in the moment. I wish I could have spent more time with Dave.  Our time here is so short, and it's only with hindsight that you realize how precious the moments we have together are.  He will be my friend and brother forever, and I hope that I can in some way be a comfort to Shannon and Fiona in the years to come.  I will always remember Dave and share what I learned from him with others.

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Colleen
11 years ago

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11 years ago

When I think of Dave, I think of his smile, his way with children, and how much he loved his family. I also think of all the conversations we had around sports and music. We would debate what would make the Mariners, Seahawks or Sonics better. I'm hoping Dave can pull a few strings to get us an elusive championship here in Seattle as it has been too long. I will always remember Dave and share with Fiona my wonderful memories of him and how much her daddy loved her. I'm blessed for having such a wonderful brother-in-law. Love you Dave.

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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11 years ago

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Colleen
11 years ago

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Calvin Baseler
11 years ago

Dave, I will forever miss you. You were a generous and wonderful neighbor and even a better friend. I will never forget the kindness you shared with me and everyone around you. Your life was too short lived, and I only wish I could see you one last time so I could tell you how much you mean to everyone. I will always remember the times we spent together playing basketball and making delicious food. I was lucky to know you as a friend and Fiona was lucky to have you as a dad. You will always have a place in my heart <3 -Love, Cal

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Patty Holland
11 years ago

For us, it all started with Shannon. She and our daughter, Julie, became fast friends while attending Blanchet High School. Shannon was just one of those special kids that had a permanent place in our family. After graduation, it wasn't long before we started hearing about Dave. We knew he had to be wonderful, or Shannon would never have chosen him. And....he was! He met our very first requirement of being a diehard Husky fan, and the way he looked at Shannon didn't hurt! Shannon and Dave set the goal of college graduation before marrying, and shortly after we're joined. As Julie stood as a bridesmaid, her friendship with Shannon moved from 2 to 3, with the addition of Dave. Julie had learned to love and appreciate Dave every bit as much as Shannon. Besides music and sports, Dave and Mark seemed to have parallel lives, decades apart, and shared many emotions. Moving us to Vancouver put us at a disadvantage in seeing Dave and Shannon. One memory we have is when Julie graduated. Shannon and Dave drove down for the weekend. The weather was stunning, so the outside stereo was playing as the outdoor games commenced. Dave was in his glory, challenging all of us to croquet, while rocking out to the music. They made Julie's special day an even better memory. When Shannon and Dave had Fiona, their world was complete, and they embarked on an unimaginable love affair with her. She is such a mix of the two, sometimes looking just like Dave, and yet smiling just like Shannon. Fiona will be Dave's representative for Shannon. Her little loving spirit will keep his light burning. Dave, although your life was short lived, WELL DONE! You managed to enrich the lives of everyone you met. No pressure intended, but we expect the Huskies to supremely improve now that you have everyone in heaven rocking purple and gold!

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11 years ago

Dave was my classmate, co-worker, brother-in-law, Godfather to my daughter Kate and a friend. In college Dave never failed to tease me when I nod off in class and would always share his lecture notes with me. While my goal in class was to pass the next test, Dave's was always to seek real understanding of the material. At work Dave was a dedicated engineer, but he also brought a lot of fun to the office. He turned a piece of plywood into a ping pong table with toilet paper as the net, made paddles out of cardboard and got everyone playing. Our manager eventually bought us a real ping pong table, and Dave went on to win the ultimate office ping pong championship and was crowned the coveted title "The Ponginator". Dave would bring all sorts of yummy food to the office made by my mother-in-law and generously share them with me. He always had something nice to say about the O'Meara's which made me want to be a part of that family as well. After he became my brother-in-law, I saw a side of him that I didn't know before - his love for kids. Whenever he was around, the nieces and nephews naturally flocked to him. There was always laughter coming from the basement during family gatherings of Dave devising new games to entertain nieces and nephews of all ages. After Dave became a father, I never ceased to marvel at his infinite patience with Fiona. Being a mother of toddlers I know that patience is a virtue seldom attained, but it just came natural for Dave. Dave had the patience to teach my daughter the optimal way to do a ballet spin that maximizes the number of turns. He had the patience to analyze my 2 year old son's scribble and discover the artistic quality in it. My last conversation with Dave was on Super Bowl Sunday when I asked him whether the stadium that the Super Bowl takes place every year get renamed to Superdome for a day. Dave just smiled and patiently answered my question without making fun of me. Sensing that I might have felt silly at how ignorant my question was, he told me that my question was cute just to make me feel better. Dave is such a kind person, he never fails to see the good in others because he has a heart of gold. Someday if I follow a rainbow to the end, I just may find Dave there playing his guitar

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11 years ago

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11 years ago

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11 years ago

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11 years ago